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The Absolutely True Diary of A Part-time Indian

Alexie, Sherman (Book Club Kit - 2007)
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
The Absolutely True Diary of A Part-time Indian
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Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.
Authors: Alexie, Sherman 1966-
Title: The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian
[kit]
Publisher: New York : Little, Brown, 2007
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: 229 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
10 books and 1 reading guide in a plastic tote
Series:
Notes: Replacement for kit is $184.50
Kit checks out for 6 weeks and cannot be renewed
Kit contains 10 copies of the title
Summary: Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.
Awards & Distinctions: Reading Group Books 2008
WCLS Books in a Box
Additional Contributors: Forney, Ellen
Statement of Responsibility: by Sherman Alexie ; art by Ellen Forney
Subject Headings: Race relations Fiction Indian reservations Fiction Indians of North America Washington (State) Fiction Spokane Indians Fiction Spokane Indians Juvenile fiction Authors, American Washington (State) Fiction Diaries Fiction
Topical Term: Race relations
Indian reservations
Indians of North America
Spokane Indians
Spokane Indians
Reading group books
WCLS Book Club Kit
Authors, American
Diaries
LCCN: 2007022799
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Nov 13, 2014
  • gusmcrae rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Beautiful coming-of-age tale. This book had me in tears one moment and then laughing out loud the next. Sherman Alexie's protagonist, Junior, makes many profound statements throughout the book--about the trap of a life spent in poverty, Indians dealing with alcoholism, death, "race relations," and the challenges of friendship. Although I have never been on a reservation, much of what he has to say is universal. This is a YA novel--one that has been banned for what some would consider vulgar language. I think this book might be a bit much for 7th/8th grade level, but I think it's one that high schoolers could benefit from reading. Junior is a very relatable character and I think teens will find they have a lot in common with Junior--the questions he has and the feelings he experiences. I think the book is also a great read to get teens thinking about people from different backgrounds--how are they different and how are they, ultimately, very much the same

Oct 16, 2014
  • jjfry rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

The world might be a much better place if everyone read this book. I can't recommend it more highly...just read it.

Oct 04, 2014
  • kindrabirss rated this: 1.5 stars out of 5.

I picked up this book because of it's rave reviews, the awards it had won and on recommendation of others but I really did not enjoy it. What other's described as "funny", I just found immature. It was definitely not my style of humour. What kept me to going to finish it was that it's quite an easy read and I liked the idea of someone working to change the course of the life they had been given. Junior went against the grain and tried to succeed in a society that at first did not accept him.

Jul 30, 2014
  • FedoraJoesph rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

surprisingly enjoyed this book

Jul 09, 2014
  • Booklover1235 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

A great book to try and see how it's like trying to achieve more in a world where you're not accepted. I loved this book.

Jul 09, 2014
  • NSFRA rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

THE most funniest book!!

Jun 30, 2014
  • Margo4LOVE rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I have had the opportunity to read this one twice, it is a great book.

May 30, 2014
  • JOE KEEGAN rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This book definitely lives up to what you've heard. I finished it and immediately began to push it onto other people to read. I've read a few of Sherman Alexie's other books before, and he really outdid himself with this one.

While reading the book, I was aware of it's past as being banned and challenged often. What I felt is that Alexie wrote characters realistically - they spoke, thought, and acted like teenage boys really do. I can see why this upsets people, but I would say that instead of banning, it's a good opportunity for parents and their children to discuss the book.

Ultimately, I just want to say that this book both made me laugh out loud and get choked up, and it isn't often that a book can do one or the other, let alone both.

Jan 11, 2014
  • MADKC4Ever rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

My English teacher recommended this book to me, and it is one of the funniest, coolest books I've ever read! You'll be laughing the whole time, even through some of the more serious situations in the book. It's not a hard book to read, I finished in three days. Even though it's not a long, hard book, it is definitely not recommended to younger readers. But any older teen/adult will adore it!

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Age

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Jul 16, 2014
  • blue_fish_456 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

blue_fish_456 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Jul 09, 2014
  • Booklover1235 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Booklover1235 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Jul 09, 2014
  • geodude15 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

geodude15 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

cooliothebest thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 12 and 20

Jun 19, 2014
  • blue_hummingbird_169 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

blue_hummingbird_169 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Jan 11, 2014
  • MADKC4Ever rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

MADKC4Ever thinks this title is suitable for 17 years and over

Jul 28, 2013
  • frinkerbell rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

frinkerbell thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 14 and 20

Jul 28, 2013
  • red_dog_6584 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

red_dog_6584 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Jul 15, 2013
  • orange_squirrel_4 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

orange_squirrel_4 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

May 31, 2013
  • SMDB rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

SMDB thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

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Summary

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Jul 09, 2014
  • Booklover1235 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

"the absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian" by Sherman Alexie is about a boy named junior who was raised on a reservation and was always made fun of. But when the chance comes to change to a school where he can actually achieve something and do something he has to choose,wether to be called a traitor by everybody he knows or tries to show the Rez that he is willing to push everything aside to prove that there is more to life than drinking.

Oct 23, 2012
  • Ms_Silva rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

High school student on the Rez decides to buck tradition and attend the best high school in the region, 22 miles away and almost all White. Funny cartoons. Matter-of-fact.

Jun 17, 2012
  • Ninja_Kevin rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I have finished a book called "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie a realistic fiction novel. In this book it is about a Indian boy who is lving on a small rezervation or rez and he has a best friend name Rowdy. They both go to school on the rezervation name Wellpinit. Arnold Spirit a fouteen year old teenager and the protagonist is a book kisser what this mean is that he like to read and write. When he had gone to school , during geometry class Mr.P his teacher had passed out textbooks. When Arnold relizes that he got his mothers textbook that was at least thirty years old he threw it at Mr.P in the face. Then Mr.P came over to his house to talk to him about what he had done. When Mr.P said something like, if you don't leave this rezervation then you will die. Another thing he said was something like if you are the only one who hasn't gave up, every one has gave up even the teachers at his school had gave up even his parents had gave up even his best friend Rowdy had gave up. He also wanted the world to know that he is important. What will happen next?

Jun 17, 2012
  • loveneverlies1 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Sherman Alexie’s dark comedy offers up insight about respect, identity and acceptance in unadorned, briskly paced language that will appeal to many teens. Junior Spirit is a Spokane Indian eager to begin high school on his reservation. His hopes of newfound knowledge and opportunities are dashed when he is assigned the same textbook that belonged to his uneducated, impoverished mother thirty years earlier, bringing on a sense of fatalism and despair. Urged by his teacher to respect his dreams and demand more from life than can be expected on the reservation, Junior bravely gathers his dignity and stands up for himself by transferring to a school in a distant town. So begins his search for identity and his place in the world, as “Junior Spirit”, traitor to his people, is ostracized on the rez for consorting with whites, while “Arnold Spirit Junior”, alone, navigates the racism and mystifying cultural rules of an all-white school. “Absolutely True Diary” could easily become a litany of anger, pain and hopelessness; the poverty, alcoholism, violence and incredible death rate chronicled in the novel seems insurmountable. Yet for every tragic event, there is a detail to give us hope or even a laugh, and even the most debauched characters receive understanding and a chance at redemption. Arnold’s cartoon sketches of the people around him, drawn by artist Ellen Forney, amuse and meld seamlessly with the tone of the text. Arnold’s spirit, however, is the most compelling aspect of the book, and his relentless determination to succeed in escaping the fate of his tribe lingers with the reader, making him one of the most inspiring characters in young adult fiction today. Arnold’s quest for a better life proves that acceptance is won by earning respect, and the first step in gaining the respect of others is respecting yourself

Mar 24, 2012
  • wrightlibtech rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Sherman Alexie’s dark comedy offers up insight about respect, identity and acceptance in unadorned, briskly paced language that will appeal to many teens. Junior Spirit is a Spokane Indian eager to begin high school on his reservation. His hopes of newfound knowledge and opportunities are dashed when he is assigned the same textbook that belonged to his uneducated, impoverished mother thirty years earlier, bringing on a sense of fatalism and despair. Urged by his teacher to respect his dreams and demand more from life than can be expected on the reservation, Junior bravely gathers his dignity and stands up for himself by transferring to a school in a distant town. So begins his search for identity and his place in the world, as “Junior Spirit”, traitor to his people, is ostracized on the rez for consorting with whites, while “Arnold Spirit Junior”, alone, navigates the racism and mystifying cultural rules of an all-white school.

“Absolutely True Diary” could easily become a litany of anger, pain and hopelessness; the poverty, alcoholism, violence and incredible death rate chronicled in the novel seems insurmountable. Yet for every tragic event, there is a detail to give us hope or even a laugh, and even the most debauched characters receive understanding and a chance at redemption. Arnold’s cartoon sketches of the people around him, drawn by artist Ellen Forney, amuse and meld seamlessly with the tone of the text.

Arnold’s spirit, however, is the most compelling aspect of the book, and his relentless determination to succeed in escaping the fate of his tribe lingers with the reader, making him one of the most inspiring characters in young adult fiction today. Arnold’s quest for a better life proves that acceptance is won by earning respect, and the first step in gaining the respect of others is respecting yourself.

Arnold Spirit is 14 when he makes the life-altering decision to transfer to a school off the Spokane Indian Reservation. The only other Indian at his new school is the mascot.

Notices

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Jul 09, 2014
  • Booklover1235 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: Uses some inappropriate language.

Jan 11, 2014
  • MADKC4Ever rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: The most prominent situation is a 16 year old boy talking about how he loves masturbation, but there's a lot more sexual references sprinkled throughout the book.

Jan 11, 2014
  • MADKC4Ever rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: Lota of curse words/sexual curse words in this book.

Sep 19, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: Masturbation

Jun 17, 2012
  • loveneverlies1 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Violence: fight

Jun 17, 2012
  • loveneverlies1 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: faggot

Oct 09, 2011
  • ChocolateChips rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

Quotes

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Jul 09, 2014
  • NSFRA rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

"Life is never easy"

Jun 28, 2012
  • pplarel rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

pg. 13 "Poverty doesn't give you strength or teach you lessons about perseverence. No, poverty only teaches you how to be poor."

pg. 97 "The world, even the smallest parts of it, is filled with things you don't know."

pg. 107 "There are all kinds of addicts, I guess. We all have pain. And we all look for ways to make the pain go away."

pg. 129 "If you let people into your life a little bit, they can be pretty damn amazing."

Jun 17, 2012
  • loveneverlies1 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

When anybody, no matter how old they are, loses a parent, I think it hurts the same as if you were only five years old, you know? I think all of us are always five years old in the presence and absence of our parents.

Sep 11, 2009
  • kimbalee rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

When anybody, no matter how old they are, loses a parent, I think it hurts the same as if you were only five years old, you know? I think all of us are always five years old in the presence and absence of our parents.

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Aug 30, 2009
  • kimbalee rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

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