[]
[]

Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight

An African Childhood

Fuller, Alexandra

(Book Club Kit - 2001)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight
Print
Publisher: New York : Random House, c2001
Edition: 1st ed
Branch Call Number: B FULLER F
Characteristics: 10 books (315 p.: ill., map; 21 cm.), 1 reading guide

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

Dec 23, 2014
  • WVMLStaffPicks rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Growing up in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), “Bobo” Fuller has given us an insightful portrait of her fun-loving, ingenious English family. The rather extraordinary circumstances of her life in this southern African country before and during Mugabe’s rule are written about with compassionate realism: her mother’s fondness for gin & tonic in “watermelon porcupines”; their rather large troupe of seven lap-hopping disobedient dogs; the cook who was constantly toting a large marijuana cigarette, sprinkling ashes on everything he concocted in the kitchen; their father’s stubborn streak of independence which led them into constant adventure; and the truly agonizing loss of three adorable siblings at very young ages. It’s a wonderful read, opening up worlds intriguing and unknown to so many of us.

Apr 16, 2013
  • cynthia94066 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Would others recommend for 8th graders? At the end of 8th grade. There's violence and molestation, but it's all off page for the most part from what I recall.

May 16, 2012
  • sari rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A touching and very descriptive true story of an English family living in Africa.
The author writes quite openly about her family and the tragedies they face.

Milawi is mis spelled! it should be Malawi

Dec 28, 2011
  • anflan rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Love these books by Fuller.

Nov 28, 2011
  • lalalady rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Bare faced look at how outsiders fall in love with their adopted country and yet maintain their separateness. Highly recommended, fascinating read, makes you want to travel to Africa despite the dirt, poverty, bugs and war, because of the beauty, the teeming life and scent of it all.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this novel. Highly reccommended!

Aug 31, 2011
  • coastalkate rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

An interesting look at life in southern Africa in the 70s and 80s, from a white person's perspective (the author grew up there). Told with no apology or politeness, which may offend people who aren't familiar with the life of Africa. It's very raw and down-to-earth!
Most interesting to me was getting it from a child's perspective. This is more about the family and the person than about the bigger picture, yet you get a clear portrait of the bigger picture.

Changes your mind about the poetry of Africa

Age

Add Age Suitability

Jul 27, 2014
  • purplecow03 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

purplecow03 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Summary

Add a Summary

Jul 27, 2014
  • purplecow03 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A true story, told by Alexandra "Bobo" Fuller. It is the story of a European family born and raised in southern Africa. The story honestly portrays the challenges of every day life and Bobo's journey from girlhood to womanhood in a hostile environment.

Quotes

Add a Quote

Jul 27, 2014
  • purplecow03 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

When [Mum] kisses me good-bye, she wraps me briefly in the safe, old smell of Vicks VapoRub, tea, and perfume and it's only when I look into her eyes that I remember that she is in the middle of a nervous breakdown. She says, "Be a brave girl, okay?"
"You, too."
(Fuller 195)

Notices

Add a Notice

There are no notices for this title yet.

Find it at WCLS

  Loading...

Powered by BiblioCommons.
app03 Version musli Last updated 2015/02/24 14:10