The Whole Town's Talking

The Whole Town's Talking

A Novel

Book - 2016
Average Rating:
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Lordor Nordstrom created, in his wisdom, not only a lively town and a prosperous legacy for himself but also a beautiful final resting place for his family, friends, and neighbors yet to come. "Resting place" turns out to be a bit of a misnomer, however. Odd things begin to happen, and it starts the whole town talking. With her wild imagination, great storytelling, and deep understanding of folly and the human heart, the beloved Fannie Flagg tells an unforgettable story of life, afterlife, and the remarkable goings-on of ordinary people. In The Whole Town's Talking, she reminds us that community is vital, life is a gift, and love never dies.
Publisher: New York : Random House, [2016]
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ©2016
ISBN: 9781400065950
140006595X
Characteristics: 402 pages ; 25 cm
Alternative Title: Whole town is talking

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m
margeeaycock
Sep 12, 2017

My sister and I both love all her books.... except this one.

c
cherymcginness
May 14, 2017

Grave yard where when people in the town die, the go to the grave yard and can talk to each other.

b
bethz10
Apr 19, 2017

I thoroughly enjoy Fannie Flagg's novels. That being said, this one is not a favorite. It was entertaining right up to the end, at which point I felt that the story was ruined. I was disappointed, which has never before happened with one of Ms. Flagg's books.

q
Quet
Apr 05, 2017

I have enjoyed all of Ms Flagg’s books that are centered in Elmwood, MO. I recommend reading those before beginning this one which is something of the last in a series. You will get to know many of the characters better through her previous books and have a richer reading experience as you recognize them in this book. Good reading to you!

b
BigOrange
Jan 17, 2017

I am definitely biased but I love Fannie Flagg's novels. I must confess that I was less thrilled with "Can't Wait to Get to Heaven" than the previous books and so I skipped "The All-girls Filling Station." But this book brings back the beloved characters of Elmwood Springs in way that I thoroughly enjoyed. I loved the ending in particular - maybe it's the place I am in life now that caused this book to resonate with me. Now I want to pick up the previous two and see what I missed when my head wasn't in the right place.

l
LovieBooker
Dec 26, 2016

This is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's based on the most universal and endearing philosophies of religion... going into the afterlife with the ability to intimately know the people you immediately meet, as being the people you grew up around, loved and respected... parents, friends, teachers. Interspersed with the continuing thread of a deeply entwined community are interesting and emotive vignettes of people on the periphery. I cried, sighed, chuckled, and laughed out loud. It could be that it lent itself to the holiday season, with it's family-ties eccentricities and homespun humor, but if you read this book based on my recommendation and don't like it, I'd love to buy you dinner and talk about why.

c
cknightkc
Dec 23, 2016

I liken Fannie Flagg’s books to comfort food - enjoyable, sweet, but not too filling. Once again we return to Flagg’s idealized Elmwood Springs, Missouri in THE WHOLE TOWN’S TALKING with many of the same characters from her earlier novels, but this time the focus is on the town as the author traces its history and people from the 1880’s to 2021. As usual Flagg populates her tale with some quirky, mostly likable individuals (family trees would’ve been helpful to keep track of them all), sprinkles it with little intrigues and dashes of humor while conveying the importance of personal relationships in all phases of life. Surprisingly, there is little depth to the characters and story, most likely because of the long time span covered and Flagg’s choice to write largely in a 3rd person expository manner with little interaction between characters. In fact after the first third of the book, most of the dialogue is between and among the “residents” of Still Meadows Cemetery as they bring the reader and others up to speed with their comments about what’s been happening in the town - an interesting technique, but one I grew a little weary of with repeated use. My biggest issue is with the epilogue, but won’t say more to avoid spoilers. In spite of these criticisms, I found THE WHOLE TOWN’S TALKING to be an easy, pleasant read - perfect for a weekend or snow day - just prepare yourself to suspend reality for a time as you enjoy the “comforts” this book has to offer, including Elner Shimfissle’s buttermilk bisquits and fig preserves.

b
blustocking
Dec 06, 2016

thin and classist. her "good" characters are people who have money. she laments an america where one is "considered insensitive" if one "expects people to take care of themselves" without acknowledging the millions of americans who are working hard and not making a living wage or people who are disabled or old and are unable to take care of themselves and have been abandoned by their country as all the money goes to the wealthy or to defense. flagg is not without wisdom and i have loved a couple of her books but she's no dickens. She seems to be worried that her money is going to the poor. it's not. it's going to the rich. we have poverty by legislation now. we need wise writers. we need compassionate writers. i was disappointed in this one.

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c
cknightkc
Dec 23, 2016

"She didn't know it, but she had changed so many lives just by being there year after year, and by saying the right things at the exact right time." - page 227

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