Frank

Frank

The Voice

Book - 2010
Average Rating:
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Sinatra endowed the songs he sang with the explosive conflict of his own personality. He also made the very act of listening to pop music a more personal experience than it had ever been. In "Frank: The Voice," Kaplan reveals how he did it, bringing deeper insight than ever before to the complex psyche and turbulent life behind that incomparable vocal instrument.
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, c2010
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780385518048
0385518048
Characteristics: 786 p. : ill. ; 25 cm

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christineinseattle
Oct 11, 2012

I never understood what all the excitement was about regarding Sinatra's singing or personal life, although I admired his film career. I've even visited his Palm Springs home, Twin Palms, and still couldn't tell why he was a sensation. Now I get it, thanks to this awesome book! I've read lots of biographies for decades and this is one of the best I've ever picked up. The book is exhaustively researched and written in a way that envelopes the reader in another world. And the photos are memorable. Even though it was over 700 pages, I was sorry when I finished it and could no longer immerse myself in the rich details about Frank's life in New Jersey, New York, Los Angeles, Hollywood, and Palm Springs during the first half of the 20th century.

l
lee_robb
Jul 07, 2011

Great biopic about blue eyes.

r
RAUSTIN1
Jun 25, 2011

In his notes, the author, James Kaplan mentions that he wrote this book after reading another Sinatra biography "in which, remarkably, the subject (and certainly the great artist) neither lived or breathed.

In Kaplan's book, Sinatra most certainly lives and breathes, an amazingly well researched account of this remarkable artist's life. Kaplan gets inside Frank's head and certainly drew this reader in with him.

My only complaint is that he ends the story in 1954. Hopefully further volumes will follow.

debwalker Jan 02, 2011

"A very complicated man. A musical tsunami who sang with such unprecedented beauty, taste and ease that he helped to create a genre called the Great American Songbook. In complete contrast to his musical beauty, Sinatra behaved like a thug, kept mobsters as friends and was a misogynist."
Review by Ross Porter
Globe & Mail Jan 1 2011

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